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A few months ago KJ and I purchased a lovely little stone that had been collected from the American River in California.  What struck us about this stone was not only the quality of the physical stone but also the beauty of its color.  From a suiseki perspective, we believe it meets the criteria to be called a suiseki vs. a viewing stone.

This suiseki is a doha – a stone representing an open plain.  It has nice characteristics in that the mountain on this plain is roughly 1/3 the size of the overall length of the stone.

When we acquired this stone it came with a diaza. However, no disrespect to the diaza maker, this diaza seemed to detract from the suiseki rather than complement it.  Let’s take a look at the stone in its original diaza.

Doha with diaza from an unknown maker

Doha with diaza from an unknown maker

As you can see this is a very tall diaza for the size of the stone.  The color isn’t bad but if you notice with the depth of this diaza a bit of the stone is not shown.  The other thing that struck us is the first thing we saw when looking at the combination of stone and diaza was the diaza – not good.  It is important for the diaza to complement but not distract from the stone.  The same principal applies in bonsai and the pot it is contained in.

We commissioned a new diaza to be made for this stone.

Doha suiseki with a new diaza

Doha suiseki with a new diaza

So what do you immediately notice?  Well for us it was several things: 1) We immediately see the stone and not the diaza; 2) We see more of the stone; 3) The diaza complements the stone; and, 4) The overall feeling is much better. The angle of the photos are just a bit different so please excuse this in the two photographs.

We believe the stone has been enhanced by the new diaza – what do you think?  Please post comments if you have the time.

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