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Suiseki, doban and stand

Suiseki, doban and stand

Today is Part III of a series on Hirohisa Shimizu’s beautiful stands.  This stand was a part of another blot post, but we wanted to include it again to talk more directly about the quality of this stand and why it works so well with suiseki.

Shimizu, Hirohisa stand 24cm

Shimizu, Hirohisa stand (24 x 15 x 2.5cm)

We love low profile stands for suiseki.  This stand is 24cm wide but only 2.5cm tall which for us is well proportioned.  Notice as well the leg brace running the width of the stand – see how he partially raises the brace in the middle?  We think that adds a feeling of “airiness” to the stand and we like that he breaks up what could be a very monotonous look by having two nearly parallel lines if the brace was also straight.

Shimizu, Hirohisa stand 24cm

Shimizu, Hirohisa stand 24cm

This side view helps to provide an overall view of the stand and frankly we like this photo the best when showing this stand to others who are interested in purchasing them.  All the lines are harmonious, leaving us with the feeling of simplicity and the mood of calmness.  This was pointed out by one of our readers when we posted before – this feeling of calmness.

For us it is very difficult to obtain this feeling of calm.  Often the stand brings a bit of harshness or perhaps more accurately stated a feeling of hardness.  This can, of course, work with the proper stone but we who exhibit really need to think through the feeling of the stone, or as importantly the feeling that we wish to impart as we pair up the suiseki with a stand.  Of course, this desire to keep harmony is further complicated if one wants to display an exhibit that also includes a tree or a matching scroll.  This is the subject for someone who is better qualified than us to speak to this subject such as  Hideko Metaxas or Jim Greaves.

Shimizu, Hirohisa stand - corner details

Shimizu, Hirohisa stand - corner details

Our final photo of today is the detail in the end-piece.  We believe this aspect of the design is key to maintaining this sense of lightness and calmness.  By softening the corner by the use of an elongated radial curve, it softens the joining of these two side.  How often have we seen plain butt joints on a stand that tends to “bulk” up the look.  Also, without the indentation in the radial curve going from top to bottom, even the curve itself would seem quite heavy.  Just compare the outside of the corner (lower left) to the inside of the corner (top right).

With just a few moments of observing, we can see that Shimizu is a master craftsmen not only in woodworking but fundamentally more important in the design of these stands.

His series of stands range in price from 25-40,000 Yen; roughly $325 to $525 US.  He will also custom design a stand to your specifications; at what price I have no idea.

If you are interested in obtaining any of his stands, please contact us and we will put you in touch with an intermediary in Japan who can acquire them for you.

We hope you enjoyed these stands and I’m sure you will see them many more times as we post up pictures of suiseki and pots perched upon them.

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