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There are many sites in Japan that we search to find new potters or when we are in the market to acquire a particular pot.  Early this morning we went to a site that we only visit every 3-4 months as they mostly sell trees and tools.  In looking at a link that was somewhat hidden on the site, I discovered a page of special pots – special in that you have to contact them to get a price – and one in particular by Takeyama Fukushima really stood out.

Takeyama Fukushima Bonsai Pot (10 x 6 cm)

Takeyama Fukushima Bonsai Pot (10 x 6 cm)

We really like small pots and this certainly qualifies at 10×6 cm.  To have the artistic talent to be able to draw by hand on a pot like this is just amazing.  Let’s take a deeper look at this pot and see if you agree.

Takeyama Fukushima Bonsai Pot (10 x 6 cm)

Takeyama Fukushima Bonsai Pot (10 x 6 cm)

Takeyama Fukushima Bonsai Pot (10 x 6 cm)

Takeyama Fukushima Bonsai Pot (10 x 6 cm)

Notice the reversal of the Foo Dog; there are three of them drawn on this pot.  We also really appreciate the detail on the legs and the lower half of the pot.

Takeyama Fukushima Bonsai Pot

Takeyama Fukushima Bonsai Pot

With this close-up photo you can see how this was drawn by hand by noticing the small imperfections in the line drawings found on the pot.

Takeyama Fukushima Bonsai Pot

Takeyama Fukushima Bonsai Pot - Foot Detail

These look like flower petals to us.  As you see the details above the feet is that a squid or octopus with a hat?

Takeyama Fukushima Bonsai Pot

Takeyama Fukushima Bonsai Pot

The use of the repeating patters at the top, all hand drawn, add complexity but a feeling of elegance to the pot’s design.  Do you have the patience, much less the ability, to draw the design on this pot?  I have often wondered if they draw and then transfer the outline of the drawing on the pot itself.  I have seen people use pencil to outline the drawing and then paint the pot later with glaze.

Takeyama Fukushima Bonsai Pot

Takeyama Fukushima Bonsai Pot

A nicely drawn rim which always puzzles us on how the design comes out so evenly.  Do they start at quarter points?  It seems like lines on the left are just a bit longer than those on the right but that could also be lens distortion when the photo was taken.

Takeyama Fukushima – Artist Mark

Takeyama Fukushima - Artist Mark

Takeyama Fukushima - Artist Mark

We have noticed on many of the high end pots (Yusen, Kouzan) that the artist mark is drawn rather than imprinted in the clay of the pot.  This is a very nice design with the eight spiral arms and then the artist mark nicely enclosed by a red box.  We really appreciate the extra time taken for the artist to do this especially after all the complex drawings that had to be painted on the pot itself.

As mentioned in the Ito Gekkou post, we have really begun to appreciate these types of bonsai pots and especially so since we tend to collect and show them in our home.  I guess the question is should we email for the price of this pot? Well normally I would say yes, but we have our eye on this Yusen pot…  More to come.

 

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