Jerry and I got together about 2 months ago to talk about suiseki, enjoy a cup of coffee or two and to discuss having him make some kiri wood boxes for us.  Like most collectors, we find ourselves over time with lots of pots and stones sitting around on storage shelves just waiting to be tipped over or slammed against each other.

When we buy things we always hope they have a storage box but more and more often this is not the case.  So we ask Jerry if he could build nine boxes for us for a variety of things from stones to pots.

Kiri Wood Box (9x3-inch) for an antique Chinese pot.

Kiri Wood Box (9×3-inch) for an antique Chinese pot. Pot shown below.

Click the photos for a larger version.

Antique Chinese Pot

Antique Chinese Pot

So in discussing with Jerry how we wanted them made, we took out a few boxes made in Japan some 30-40 years ago and we described what we liked about them.  Jerry was able to incorporate all of those features into the boxes he made for us.

The set of preferred features were:

  • Mitered corners
  • An additional base for the box to sit upon
  • Routed doors
  • A small rosewood inlay indicating the top of the door
  • Lastly, a channeled bottom so the door fit snugly and securely

The quality of Jerry’s work speaks to his ability to craft from wood.  Nice clean cuts with a good sanded finish making the box very clean in appearance and a nice feel in the hands.

These two boxes were made for suiseki.

These two boxes were made for suiseki.

Interior view.

Interior view.

The box on the left is to house two waterfall stones.The right most box will house another suiseki we collected in Northern California.  For the box on the left we decided not to have a separate area for the stone and daiza, whereas on the right we did.  This was more a matter of the stones and their daizas than just a random choice.  Both of the waterfall stones have natural but very rough textured bottoms and this lead to our decision to place them in their daizas to be stored.

For the stone on the right the decision was to separate them. This decision was based on the stone having a nice smooth but natural bottom and as importantly because the daiza has a heavy upturned lip on the right side to support the stone. We wanted to be sure this didn’t take a hit on the side of the box with a stone in it if we inadvertently dropped the box.

Pot box on the left and a stone box on the right.

Pot box on the left and a stone box on the right.

Interior views.

Interior views.

The left box will hold three very small but elegant Ichiyo pots.  They are so delicate we were afraid that they might be chipped if we just loosely stored them on a shelf.  This type of box also reminds us of how five Toufukuji pots are stored this way. You can see that photo on page 38 of his book.

Jerry did an excellent job for us and we can highly recommend him. We have experienced how much he cares about his work product in just the way he packed everything for shipment. Nicely bubble wrapped, with paper to keep things tight and then shipped in a nice chip-wood container to insure things arrived just right.

KJ and I tend to rotate things in our collection to be displayed in our home and having these boxes makes it much easier to stack and store them when not in use.  The extra protection they provide is a real plus.

If you are interested in having Jerry made some from you – just contact him via his web site. Click here to visit Jerry’s blog.

Enjoy the holiday weekend.

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